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Portraits, Pop-Ups, Prognosticators, and a Proof of Concept

Well it turns out that if you want to make a photocomic, being a great photographer doesn’t hurt. Who knew?

Seth Kushner’s Culture Pop (not to be confused with CulturePulp by Mike Russell) features photocomics of real life characters. Click on the chapter numbers to surf from person to person. It’s pretty cool.

This being Friday, a few odds and ends:

A couple of cool not-comics books in the mailbox this week. I’ve just started diving into Kevin Kelly’s new book What Technology Wants but it’s a fascinating read already. And Andrew Farago’s first book is out, a handsome new Loony Tunes Treasury, with all sorts of fun sproingy extras in it.

Finally, Mike Leung offers a little proof-of-concept experiment mixing words and pictures:

An adaptation of Swift’s Modest Proposal that gives the reader control of the story progress via common-sense scrolling, can be as light as you can make your image files. and needs no commercial tools to publish other than what it takes to post digitize artwork online.”

Have a great weekend!


Discussion (6)¬

  1. Mike Leung says:

    Thanks for linking me, Scott.

  2. Morgan says:

    In re: Culture Pop, I love Baron Ambrosia and Bronx Flavor! Just an awesome trippy show!

  3. Wood says:

    Hey Mr McCloud,

    Do you remember linking to this comic back in 2004 or 2005 ? (this page specifically) : http://rockyfoxtop.comicgenesis.com/d/20040613.html

    Look at what the author is doing today !
    http://lizsuburbia.corkyberlin.com/

    (updates at her livejournal : http://lizsuburbia.livejournal.com/ )

    This kids grow up so fast !

  4. [...] to Wood on Friday’s comment thread, I linked to a page of Liz’s several years ago but her stuff has grown by leaps and bounds [...]

  5. Mike Leung says:

    Does anyone have a clue what I should do next with my trippy display-technique?

    I submitted my page to Chrome Experiments, and my logs show it linked from a folder named “unapproved” on their site. Their about page refers to a commitment to making the web faster and more open. But I guess providing an option in the mostly unoccupied territory between the conventional web document, and hiring a media studio to make an RSA-like presentation, doesn’t qualify.

    Should I do more of the same? I’m currently reading Machiavelli. Will that make an impact where Swift doesn’t, or is that too archaic? Maybe someone has some unlettered artwork files lying around that they want to see displayed in this manner alongside conventional text?