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Archive for ‘Cartoonists’


Notes from Hibernation #2

This blog is going to be pretty quiet this year while I continue work on the graphic novel, but wanted to pass along a couple of links.

Congratulations to Spike and Diana Nock for a successful Kickstarter for Poorcraft, and to Jeff Parker and Erika Moen for the recently completed Bucko, both of which will be out soon in book form.

Also recently completed is Kane Lynch’s The Relics and if you have an Android phone, be sure to put some Merlin in it.

Two artists in trouble this month: S. Clay Wilson and Tony DeZuniga. Help if you can.

Two recent passings that struck a chord: The great Moebius, who had a huge influence on me (and most of my generation probably). Also very sad to hear of the loss of Peter Bergman of Firesign Theatre fame. I had the pleasure of spending time with Peter at a conference in Colorado about 15 years ago and was able to tell him how much his work had shaped my teen years. Moebius, I met only once (at Comic-Con). I told him he changed my life and he just laughed and said “I’m so sorry!”

That’s all for now. Back to the Cintiq. Many pages yet to draw, so you won’t hear from me much for a while, but I hope it’ll be worth the wait.

You can also find me on both Twitter and Google+ (where I pop-up a little more often than here).

[Image from the cool webcomic Poppa Bears found via Spurge]


He Made the Giant Pen, You Can Bet He’ll Make the Comic

Tom Spurgeon said it best on Twitter: “I would empty my wallet for Jim Woodring were he to walk up to me and ask, so of course I’ll give something to this…”

I’m always excited by a new Woodring book, but when I can tell that Jim himself is especially excited about a book, that’s an event in the making. Let’s help make it happen, shall we?


Notes from Hibernation

Things are pretty quiet here, while I concentrate on my graphic novel in the coming months.

Did want to take a moment though to acknowledge the unspeakably sad news that cartoonists Tom Hart and Leela Corman have lost their little girl, Rosalie Lightning. There’s a fund to contribute to, if you’d like to help with the practical aspects of the coming weeks, and of course, the condolences have been pouring in. This note by their old friend and mine Jon Lewis feels about right to me. These are deeply loved members of our community, and with good reason. Their beautiful family deserved a better road.


Outfoxed by Dylan Meconis


What a great little story by Dylan Meconis of Family Man fame. Also out since my last post is the beginnings of a new Emily Carroll story, so don’t miss that either.

Oh, and I hope you’ve all bought Craig Thompson’s monumental Habibi by now. If not, what are you waiting for?! (Yes, it’s as beautiful and moving as everyone says).

And of course, congratulations to everyone who made it through 24-Hour Comics Day 2011 this year!

Still working furiously on the graphic novel, so I won’t be posting too much to the blog until further notice, but if anything important comes along, I’ll let you know.


Friday Odds and Ends

Al Davison is making a Graphic Novel. Let’s help him do it, shall we? Al is an extraordinary artist, with an extraordinary story to tell, and I look forward to whatever he has in store.

Also asking for a helping hand this week is the very promising documentary Stripped by Dave Kellett and Fred Schroeder. It’s a great cause (and I’m delighted that a goofy quote of mine got to be the punchline for the excellent trailer), but after such an explosive start to their fundraising campaign, I can’t imagine they won’t make their goal. So if you can only give to one (if either—I know times are tough), please consider Al this round.

Also this week, Faith Erin Hicks has begun online serialization of her new graphic novel Friends with Boys. Look great so far. Check it out.

Meanwhile, Darryl Cunningham is going after Chiropractic Therapy. Can’t miss that.

Finally, want to be a Google Doodler? Our old pal Tom Galloway reports that they’re hiring.
[Link corrected! Earlier link was to a "Doodle engineer" which is a little different.]

Off to NYC this weekend. I’m actually flying a bit early to, um, be in New York City in time for Hurricane Irene(?). Okay, not really. Just so that the hurricane doesn’t screw up my travel plans for my talk at NYU this Tuesday (not open to the public, sorry; just for freshmen in the Liberal Studies and Global Liberal Studies departments).

Have a great weekend.


Boxes, Boxes, Boxes…

Lucy Knisley knows how it feels.

My family and I are still unpacking from our recent move. I’ve spent a big chunk of my adult life in a sea of partially unpacked boxes. And worst of all is my email inbox.

I’m going to be updating this blog a bit more infrequently moving forward as I chip away at that inbox and continue work on my GN, but you can always follow me via rss, and be sure to keep an eye on my Google+ and Twitter accounts.


Friday Odds and Ends

Haha, look who I’m tied with. Also being on this more personal list made me smile.

Been looking for an excuse to link to Cameron Stewart’s beautifully rendered Sin Titulo. This news seems reason enough.

Finally, in keeping with last week’s post (and Google+ mini-meme) on art we did when we were 15 years-old, here’s an interview with talented cartoonist and entrepreneur, 14 year-old Emma Capps. The girl’s reading Asterios Polyp, People. This next generation will be something to see.


Steve on Jack

My old pal, Steve Bissette lays down the law after the recent Kirby heirs court decision.

I’m too busy with my GN to look deeply into the specifics of this case, but I did offer a brief general comment on Google+.

Jack and Roz Kirby are buried just a few miles from here. Maybe I’ll swing by this week to pay my respects.

Like so many of his generation, “the King” deserved better than he got.


And Here’s a Cause that DOESN’T Need Your Help…

…because they got more help than anyone expected!

(Though you’re welcome to buy the book when it comes out, of course.)

In the Independent Pavillion at San Diego, one of my former workshop students, the talented Jean Kang, told me about Womanthology and how their Kickstarter had rocketed past its goal.

Phenomena like Kickstarter are among the many reasons I understand and support Peter Laird’s decision to wind down the Xeric Foundation grants. This massive network of talent that we interact with on a daily basis has plenty of homegrown solutions for hungry artists up its sleeve. The days are gone when lone cartoonists had to turn to a lone source for help in entering a single door.

I’m glad Xeric was there all these years, but I’m happier still that there’s still so much more potential on the horizon.

Update: HAPPY BIRTHDAY, WINTER! Our little girl is 16 years-old today, and visiting NYC with her Mom (Sky got Shanghai with Dad, so Winter asked for Broadway and there’s no way Ivy would pass up that trip!). They’ve already seen Catch Me if You Can and Billy Elliot. Wicked and The Fantastics, still to come.


Mythomania!

Okay, we’ve moved apartments and gone to Comic-Con and back. Let’s get back to babbling about random comics news.

By far the coolest thing to happen in comics while I was on break these last few weeks was the debut of Derek Kirk Kim’s new video series Mythomania.

I have a cameo in the first episode but I’d be highly recommending these wonderful videos even if I wasn’t in it (oh Hell, especially if I wasn’t in it).

It’s a wonderful and funny portrait of aspiring young cartoonists so dead-on, it feels to me like I’ve known them for years.

Watch the first three episodes right now, and see if you don’t fall in love.

Thanks to everyone who came out to see us at Con, and to all our friends for filling our days with happy reunions and crazy conversations. It’s my family’s Thanksgiving (complete with the eating too much) and the year wouldn’t feel complete without it.