So Many Lies, So Little Time

Darryl Cunningham continues his comics crusade to untangle lies, myths, and misconceptions with a new comic defending the science that’s grown from Darwin’s theory of natural selection. As usual, he does so with wit, charm, and quiet persistence.

I’ve considered doing something similar, maybe even a book length project, but these days I have trouble even thinking about this issue without getting pissed off and just wanting to smash my head against a wall. The idea that there are so many millions of people in this country who still believe the Earth is less than 10,000 years old is a national disgrace.

But a book filled with that wouldn’t convince anyone.

So thank you, Darryl Cunningham, for suffering fools gladly. You’re a better man than I am.

[Edit to add: Scott Dubois in comments points to this recent comics explanation of Evolution by the capable team of Hosler, Cannon, and Cannon. Looks good!]

Gene Colan 1926-2011

Clifford Meth shares the details.

Gene Colan was one of my favorite artists in my early teen years, when I was first discovering comics.

The first full run of a comic book series that I read was Daredevil (lent to me by Kurt Busiek in middle school), including many issues drawn by Gene.

The first drawing I made of an established comic book character may well have been based on images he created for that series.

Gene Colan’s work was unique, personal, and always a joy to look at. May he rest in peace.

I am the Butterfly Wing that Caused the Hurricane that tried to Blow Over Matt Smith

Explanation here.

Link via Lori.

Our Bloodstained Roof

Our Bloodstained Roof is a new comic by Ryan A. It’s a substantial read, so wait until your coffee break or something, but it’s definitely worth your time.

Some of you might remember Ryan’s story “Nothing is Forgotten” which I plugged in January. I liked that story, but I think I like this one even more.

Wolk at Wired and a Bad, Bad Law

The always-sensible Douglas Wolk offers a solid round-up of issues surrounding comics and tablets for Wired this week.

Long time readers may find mostly familiar ground here, but it’s good to have someone put it all into perspective once in a while.

And the illustrations are pretty great.

Meanwhile, the CBLDF alerts us to a truly awful Tennessee law worth fighting. And as always, the CBLDF could use your help.

Stop by their site for news and some great premiums and special events coming up.

[via Spurge]

Decrypting Rita

Here’s a cool-looking new webcomic: Decrypting Rita by Egypt Urnash.

According to my old pal Thomas Blue (a visually striking artist in his own right), Egypt has an animation background, did some work at Spumco, and she might include some NSFW scenes later so be warned [...or maybe not; see correction in comments].

I like the fact that Egypt does all her artwork in Adobe Illustrator. Haven’t seen many artists do that since Demian5′s legendary When I Am King.

I also appreciate the screen-shaped pages, but, y’know… We won’t go into that rant right now.

Just wondering, those of you who watch these things like me: Have we passed the point where new interesting cartoonists are now more likely to be women than men?

If the ranks of comics pros ever get to 50% is there any chance we might just keep going?

I, for one, wouldn’t mind a bit.

Update: Found Egypt’s personal site and at least one of her biographical details sheds an interesting new light on my crossing-fifty-percent comment above. Needless to say, Egypt’s case is not typical, though not unique either.

Friday Odds and Ends

Here’s a really lovely 3-pager by David Lasky from yesterday’s Bloomsday commemorations.

Also lovely: these people sketches by Lucy Knisley. Can you draw that well? Me neither.

The Interwubs are all abuzz this week with Colleen Coover’s super-adorable and very funny Lana Lang comic. (Oh if only the monthlies were like this…)

Finally, the legendary Eddie Campbell has sent along a link to another fine article tracing comics early origins, so check it out.

[first few links via Spurge, I think]

Have a great weekend!

Ever Feel Like This?

Sydney-based Karen Beilharz is putting together a handsome anthology of stories about depression and she could use some help.

Random-y Randomness

This looks kinda cool. And weird.

I also like the look of two relatively-recent Portland-based diary comics (both of which could benefit from a dedicated website): Natalie Nourigat’s Between Gears and Emi Lenox’s EmiTown.

Meanwhile, blog entries have been popping up about last weekend’s Comics and Medicine conference. Check out accounts by John P, Brian F, and Sarah L, plus Phoebe G’s Facebook page. Not surprisingly, I look like a dork in all the pictures.

I Have Nothing Interesting to Say Today

So here’s a picture of Patrick McGoohan and a telephone.